Counterinsurgency Operations

Counterinsurgency (COIN) operations are actions ...

Culture and Religion of Enemy

Current Status: In recent years ...

Treatment/Interrogation of Irregular Combatant Prisoners

Current Status: The United States ...

Military Under Foreign Command

Current Status: The current national ...

Rules of Engagement

Current Status: Rules of engagement ...

Social Engineering in the Military

Current Status: Ideologically driven politicians, ...

Standards for Combat Personnel

Current Status: Combat is obviously ...

Religion and the Military

Current Status: In recent years ...

Civilian Control and Treatment of the Military

Current Status: The U.S. Constitution ...

A Crisis of Leadership

Current Status: The military suffers ...

Our Values, Mission, and Team (How these topics are developed.)

So what are the values of MilitaryValues.org? They are listed directly below—and then we tie these to America’s founding, her constitution and finally the role of the U.S. military. These values are:

  1. Freedom and liberty for citizens—as represented by our founding documents.
  2. Local control on most matters with a small federal government with enumerated powers.
  3. Personal responsibility of citizens—with help for the truly needed provided locally.
  4. Competence and honesty in public servants—who are not afraid to do the right thing.

These values are the foundation of America and encompassed in the Constitution and bill of rights. They are the reason for America’s great success over her history.

How does this tie to America’s military? The oath taken by each member of the armed forces, particularly the oath of office taken by commissioned officers, requires loyalty and fidelity to the Constitution as opposed to any individual, position, group or political division. This oath is:

I, [name], do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter. So help me God.

A careful reading of the oath makes clear the following:

  1. The oath calls on officers to defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic, which means those who would do harm to, and/or attempt to dishonor the word, intent and character of the Constitution and the principles that it represents. The oath is a commitment to law, revealed and explicit.
  2. The oath is taken freely in that nobody is forced to affirm their commitment to the Constitution and that they testify, again publically, that they do this without intent to evade, shirk, subvert or deride the intent and character of the Constitution and the principles that it represents. It is public declaration of intention.
  3. That the person taking the oath is placing their character on the line and that through their actions they will faithfully discharge the enumerated obligations of the oath under the watchful eye of the creator; “So help me God”.

The Mission of Military Values.org – To educate US citizens about the:

  • Overarching problem that the military is evolving into a force that increasingly at odds with its original and purposeful mission to protect the constitution—and as a result protect America.
  • Damage to America’s military from social engineering, political correctness, and self-serving political decisions—and foster a forum to discuss remediation.
  • Values and virtues that should personify military men and women who freely take the oath of office and serve in defense of the Constitution of the United States.
  • Role of the military in the eyes of the citizenry; elected officials; public servants; and current, former and future members of the armed forces and their families.

 

Our Team

We have begun public operations in early 2014—with planning and preparation occurring over the prior year. Our first activities will focus on developing our communication and education approach and developing resources to deploy the plan. Our founding team members are:

Mark Engleman – President

  • Business consultant
  • US Naval Aviator (1984-1991)

Dick Sohn – Vice President

  • Retired airline pilot
  • US Naval Aviator (1960-1965)

Sean Emerson – Corporate Secretary

  • Military history writer
  • Quality systems engineer
  • US Air Force (1981 – 1987)

Jim Myers – Corporate Treasurer

  • Management Consultant/Operations Professional
  • Educator
  • US Marine Corps (1982-1991)

Joe Angichiodo – Membership Outreach

  • Longtime veteran’s affairs volunteer
  • Commercial printer

The founding members came together based on established trust relationships and a common vision that this increasingly serious problem with the US Military could be reversed. As a group, this team has the organizing, fundraising, and leadership skills to make MilitaryValues.org successful in its ongoing mission.

 

Disclaimers
The educational process we promote challenges existing norms and various entities with a philosophical or other vested interest in the status quo—including a portion of active duty military personnel. In this regard, we want to make the following items clear:

  • MilitaryValues.org is not directly reaching out to and is not attempting to directly influence any active duty military personnel, military unit or military branch in the United States.
  • Directly or indirectly, MilitaryValues.org is not suggesting any active duty military personnel take any particular action on these matters. We acknowledge they should follow lawful orders.
  • MilitaryValues.org is not intending to or currently is influencing legislation.
  • MilitaryValues.org has a tax exempt status under Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code.